Japanese

  1. Home
  2. News Release
  3. Open Letter
  4. REPARATION FOR SURVIVORS OF JAPAN'S MILITARY SEXUAL SLAVERY SYSTEM

REPARATION FOR SURVIVORS OF JAPAN'S MILITARY SEXUAL SLAVERY SYSTEM

4 Dec 2015
[Open Letter]
Region:
Topic: Women's Rights

Shinzo Abe
Prime Minister of Japan
2-3-1 Nagatchou Chiyoda-ku Tokyo-to
100-0014 Japan

30 November 2015

Dear Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, 

I am writing on behalf of Amnesty International to urge you to ensure that on-going negotiations between the governments of Japan and the Republic of Korea result in full and effective reparation for survivors of Japan’s Military Sexual Slavery System by the Japanese Imperial Army before and during World War II.

Amnesty International, a global movement that campaigns for a world where human rights are enjoyed by all, is deeply concerned that more than 70 years after the end of World War II, survivors of these horrific crimes continue to be denied justice by the government of Japan which refuses to accept full responsibility for the crimes.

Japan has an obligation under international law to provide full and effective reparation to the victims of these crimes, which constitute of war crimes and crimes against humanity. These issues have not been addressed in post-war treaties, the Asian Women’s Fund or through other mechanisms and statements delivered by the government.

The recent agreement between the Republic of Korea to accelerate talks to resolve disputes over Japan’s military sexual slavery system and to build a “future-oriented cooperative relationship” is an important opportunity to end the decades of injustice and suffering for survivors. Amnesty International hopes this process will also lead to Japan engaging with other states that seek reparation on behalf of their nationals.

To ensure full and effective reparation for survivors, we urge the government of Japan in these negotiations to:

  • adopt a victim centred approach that takes into account the views and needs of survivors;
  • accept full responsibility and apologize unreservedly to survivors of Japan’s military sexual slavery system in a way that is acceptable to the majority of the women, and which publicly acknowledges the crimes that these women have been subjected to and restores the dignity of the survivors.
  • seek to provide comprehensive reparation to all survivors;
  • offer, in addition to compensation, other forms of reparation identified by survivors including measures of restitution, rehabilitation, satisfaction and guarantees of non-repetition;
  • reject any measures which may undermine the rights of survivors, including their ability to seek reparation and access to justice before the courts;
  • work with the government of Korea to ensure that effective systems are put in place to implement reparation measures;

Amnesty International hopes your government will take these long-overdue measures to address the harm of suffered by survivors of sexual slavery and end decades of injustice.

Yours sincerely

Thomas Schultz-Jagow
For Salil Shetty, Secretary General

*********

Park Geun-hye
President of the Republic of Korea
1 Cheong Wa Dae Road, Jongno District
Seoul, Republic of Korea

30 November 2015

Dear President Park Geun-hye,

I am writing on behalf of Amnesty International to urge you to ensure that on-going negotiations between the governments of the Republic of Korea and Japan result in full and effective reparation for survivors of Japan’s Military Sexual Slavery System by the Japanese Imperial Army before and during World War II.

Amnesty International, a global movement that campaigns for a world where human rights are enjoyed by all, is deeply concerned that more than 70 years after the end of World War II, survivors of these horrific crimes continue to be denied justice by the government of Japan which refuses to accept full responsibility for the crimes.

The recent agreement with Japan to accelerate talks to resolve disputes over Japan’s military sexual slavery system and to build a “future-oriented cooperative relationship” is an important opportunity to end these decades of injustice and suffering for survivors from the Republic of Korea. Amnesty International hopes this process will also inspire other states to seek reparation from Japan on behalf of their nationals. It is therefore vital that the negotiations achieve meaningful outcomes for survivors and do not repeat the failures and flawed efforts that have characterised Japan’s actions on this matter in recent decades.

In particular, Amnesty International urges your government during the negotiations to:

  • adopt a victim centred approach to the process involving regular consultations with all survivors to identify their needs and advocate effectively on their behalf during the negotiations;
  • seek not only compensation but other forms of reparation identified by survivors including measures of restitution, rehabilitation, satisfaction (including a full unreserved apology, establishing the truth, and other measures that acknowledge Japan’s responsibility) and guarantees of non-repetition;
  • ensure that all survivors are able to access reparation;
  • ensure that no measures are taken which undermine the rights of survivors, including their ability to seek reparation and access justice before the courts;
  • ensure that effective systems are put in place to implement reparation measures. Given the criticism by many survivors of the Asian Women’s Fund established by the Japanese government, reparation should be administered through appropriate mechanisms established by the government of the Republic of Korea.

Amnesty International hopes the Republic of Korea will take these important measures and negotiate with conviction to address the harm of suffered by survivors of sexual slavery and end decades of injustice.

Yours sincerely

Thomas Schultz-Jagow
For the Secretary General

See here also

前へ

次へ